While there are numerous high-quality puzzle titles in the App Store, most of them–whether word-, math-, or trivia-based–follow a similar structure and approach to casual iOS gaming. They live in a rare gaming space where entertainment often prevails despite any particular originality. Fortunately, some apps buck that trend and provide a new spin on the old design.

Triple Entendre is one such app. Developed by The Van Buren Boys (who seem to love Seinfeld as much as I do), the game is a mind-bender on both sides of the ball. I’ll let them explain:

Triple Entendre is a riddle, a puzzle, a quiz, and a trivia game all rolled into one. Each level includes a combination of clues and photos where you need to figure out not just what the answer is… but what the question is.

And boy, is it difficult. I started playing Triple Entendre about two weeks ago and quickly solved my way through the first 11 puzzles. I’ve been stuck on number 12 since day one. Word on the ‘net is that a bit of photo manipulation would help get the answer. I didn’t want to cheat.

But then I realized something: There’s actually no way to cheat! The point is literally to get the answer however you can, using whatever tools–including dedicated message boards–to find the correct word or phrase that leads to the next board.

And there are a lot of boards, each more difficult than those before, with new ones added all the time. The latest update pushed the total to 50, and it’s reported that only a handful of players worldwide have even made it past level 30.

Triple Entendre is a universal app, both versions offering built-in web browsers to assist with any necessary research. The iPhone layout requires a quick toggle to search the web, but the iPad’s bigger screen shows both aspects at once, streamlining the adventure considerably.

For $0.99 on the App Store, Triple Entendre is a daunting, brainteasing challenge for anyone patient and fastidious enough to give it a go. (If you’re not sure that means you, there’s also a free “Lite” version available.) True, there’s not a lot of replay value here, but that only matters once you actually finish the game.

And that ain’t happening.