If you’re looking for something to read with your coffee this Sunday morning, The New York Times has a big profile on Apple CEO Tim Cook that’s definitely worth checking out.

The piece, titled “Tim Cook, Making Apple His Own,” can be accessed at NYTimes.com and discusses Cupertino’s transition from Jobs to Cook, Tim Cook’s personal ideology, and Apple’s long-rumored wearable product (the so-called “iWatch”) which we’re expecting to see launch later this year.

While we’ve heard certain elements before (such as Cook witnessing the harrowing sight of a cross-burning during his childhood, and how this gave him an awareness “that no matter what you do in life, human rights and dignity are values that need to be acted upon”), the piece also offers new information on Cook and his position as leader of Apple.

In particular, Jony Ive, senior vice president of Design, was briefly interviewed for the profile, and commented on Apple’s transition from the late Steve Jobs to Tim Cook. This happened nearly three years ago following the death of Jobs:

Jonathan Ive, the head of design at Apple and a name nearly as adored by its followers as Steve Jobs, says Mr. Cook has not neglected the company’s central mission: innovation. “Honestly, I don’t think anything’s changed,” he said. And that includes the clamor for some exciting new thing. “People felt exactly the same way when we were working on the iPhone,” Mr. Ive added.

Apple’s “innovation” is expected to center around an upcoming smart watch product. Concerning Cook’s involvement with Cupertino’s anticipated iWatch, however, The New York Times added:

Lower-level employees praise Mr. Cook’s approachability and intellect. But some say he is less hands-on in developing products than his predecessor. They point to the development of the so-called iWatch — the “smartwatch” that Apple observers are eagerly awaiting as the next world-beating gadget. Mr. Cook is less involved in the minutiae of product engineering for the watch, and has instead delegated those duties to members of his executive cabinet, including Mr. Ive, according to people involved in the project, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to press. Apple declined to comment on the watch project.

Mr. Cook appears to be interested in the smartwatch’s broader implications — for instance, that a watch might monitor heart rate and other vital measures, thus improving health and limiting doctor visits, according to these people.

This definitely falls in-line with previous reports; during WWDC, Apple even previewed its “Health” app (which ships with iOS 8), and it’s thought this new mobile application will sync up with Cupertino’s wearable iWatch product.

As mentioned, The New York Times’ profile of Cook comes highly recommended. You can read the full article now by clicking this link.

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