petition

We are always here to lend a helping hand to all of you App Store developers out there, and today we have a special request from David and Susan Lee at GP Apps.

David and Susan Lee have decided to write a letter petitioning Apple to stop rejecting apps and app updates that use a custom camera view.  The general idea of the petition is that Apple is unfairly rejecting new apps and app updates that use this feature even though they have already allowed other apps to use it in the past.  The petition goes on to explain how David and Susan Lee feel Apple is confusing developers by flip-flopping on the issue.

To help out their cause, David and Susan Lee at GP Apps are asking all developers to sign the petition below by emailing supportgpa [at] gmail [dot] com with a “yes to petition letter” along with your name and company at the top of the email, but they ask that you do so by June 7th.  They already have several photo app developers on-board, so why not help out?

Check out the petition included below to help out your fellow developer!

Dear Apple,

We are petitioning you to end the unfair practice of rejecting apps and updates that use custom camera views.

Recently many photo app developers have had their apps and updates rejected due to using a custom camera view (custom subclasses).  Rejection emails have claimed that this is an unpublished API, but we disagree.  To us, using a custom camera view with subclasses has been encouraged, highlighted and published by Apple.

1.  In February, Apple started to highlight usage of the custom camera view on the front page of the iTunes AppStore.
25shot app was highlighted on the front page using a custom camera view with custom subclasses.  This signaled to thousands of developers that Apple now encourages and highlights usage of a custom camera view.  This was a clear “publishing” of this API by Apple.

2.  From February to April, Apple approved dozens of apps and updates using custom camera view with custom subclasses.
This further encouraged developers that usage of a custom camera view was encouraged by Apple. This was another implicit publishing of this API by Apple.  Note: it wasn’t just one app, but rather dozens of apps with custom camera views that were being approved.

3.  Apple apparently stopped approving apps with custom camera view around April, but continued to feature such apps.
QuadCam was featured on the front page of the iTunes AppStore even until May 21.  Again, by featuring such apps on the front page of the App Store, Apple published and encouraged usage of the custom camera view with subclasses.

It is confusing and unfair for Apple to reject apps and updates that use a custom camera view when Apple was the one that encouraged developers to use this function by featuring and highlighting such apps.

Apple, please honor your partnership with developers and immediately end the unfair practice of rejecting apps and updates that use custom camera views.

regards,
David and Susan Lee, GP Apps