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Apple's iOS 7 May Include 'Deeply' Integrated Versions Of Flickr And Vimeo

Apple's practice of embedding certain social networks into mobile looks likely to continue in iOS 7. In an exclusive report, 9to5Mac claims that the next version of iOS could include significant Flickr, and Vimeo integration. According to a "person familiar with the software," Apple is currently testing "deeply" integrated versions of Flickr and Vimeo in iOS 7. Both are said to allow users to sign into the respective networks via iOS 7's Settings application. Similar user-enabled integrations are already possible in iOS 6 for Facebook and Twitter. With Flickr, users would be able to share photos using a single tap from a system-wide menu. Vimeo, according to 9to5Mac's source, would become iOS' primary video-sharing option, and replace Google's YouTube service in this regard. As one may recall, YouTube lost this status when Apple removed the native YouTube app in iOS 6. Apple still allows users to quickly upload video to the Google service. After Apple's remove, Google released their own YouTube app for iOS. It isn't known, however, whether Vimeo be "fully replacing YouTube video uploading" in the next version of iOS. The report notes that Vimeo was integrated into Mac OS Mountain Lion last year, as was Flickr. Finally, it should be noted that Apple could pull either, or both integrations, from the final version of iOS 7. Recall that beta versions of iOS 4 included Facebook integration. However, this integration didn't actually make it to a public OS release until iOS 6 in 2012. Instead, Apple selected Twitter to be the first social network to deeply integrate with iOS. That happened with iOS 5 in 2011. Apple will likely unveil iOS 7 at next month's Worldwide Developers Conference.
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