You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience.

Advertising Guru Lee Clow Talks Apple, Steve Jobs And More

Chairman and Global Director of TBWA/Media Arts Lee Clow recently gave a talk in which Apple, Steve Jobs, and the consumer electronics industry were subjects of discussion. Particularly, Clow offers a new theory on the reason behind Apple's fruity name, gleaned from the 30 years he spent working with the late CEO and Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, and in doing so shares a unique and interesting insight into the company. Described in Business Insider's original report as Apple's go-to "ad factory," TBWA/Media Arts worked with Apple on the company's "Think Different" campaign, its famous iPod silhouette commercial, and more. In a talk given at the PTTOW summit, Clow inevitably shared some of his experiences working with Apple and Steve Jobs. Business Insider reports:
He starts talking about Jobs at the minute mark, when he describes meeting Jobs in his twenties. The legend is that apples were Jobs' favorite fruit, and Jobs once worked in an orchard. But Clow says Jobs was very influenced by Sony's branding strategy. Sony originally had a Japanese nam, Tokyo Tsoshiu Kogyo KK, but the company changed it to one that was easily pronounced globally, in any language. It was also chosen because it sounds "sunny." Clow believes Jobs wanted that same warm feeling for the name of his compter company.
The 10-minute video of Clow's talk is embedded below - be sure to check it out.

If you can't see the above video, please click this link.

Alternatively, for more of today's news, see: Forget September: Apple's iPhone 5S Set For October Launch, Report SuggestsBMW To Feature Siri Eyes Free Integration Throughout 2014 Car Model Range, and With Just 3 Days To Go, Apple Updates Official WWDC 2013 App With Various Bug Fixes.
Related Articles

Steve Jobs' Words To Play Central Role In Apple's E-Book Price Fixing Trial

Microsoft Co-Founder Bill Gates Discusses Steve Jobs In Recent Interview