Ahead of the launch of the “iPhone 6″ and iOS 8, Apple has just updated its App Store review guidelines to add new sections for new features that are set to make their debut on its latest mobile operating system.

As noted by MacRumors, Apple’s App Store review guidelines now include new sections for Extensions, HomeKit, HealthKit, and TestFlight (sections 25 through 28). These new sections essentially outline the dos and don’ts that iOS app developers need to abide by to ensure the inclusion of their apps on the App Store:

Section 25: Extensions

  • 25.1 Apps hosting extensions must comply with the App Extension Programming Guide
  • 25.2 Apps hosting extensions must provide some functionality (help screens, additional settings) or they will be rejected
  • 25.3 Apps hosting extensions that include marketing, advertising, or in-app purchases in their extension view will be rejected
  • 25.4 Keyboard extensions must provide a method for progressing to the next keyboard
  • 25.5 Keyboard extensions must remain functional with no network access or they will be rejected
  • 25.6 Keyboard extensions must provide Number and Decimal keyboard types as described in the App Extension Programming Guide or they will be rejected
  • 25.7 Apps offering Keyboard extensions must have a primary category of Utilities and a privacy policy or they will be rejected
  • 25.8 Apps offering Keyboard extensions may only collect user activity to enhance the functionality of their keyboard extension on the iOS device or they may be rejected

Section 26: HomeKit

  • 26.1 Apps using the HomeKit framework must have a primary purpose of providing home automation services
  • 26.2 Apps using the HomeKit framework must indicate this usage in their marketing text and they must provide a privacy policy or they will be rejected
  • 26.3 Apps must not use data gathered from the HomeKit APIs for advertising or other use-based data mining
  • 26.4 Apps using data gathered from the HomeKit API for purposes other than improving the user experience or hardware/software performance in providing home automation functionality will be rejected

Section 27: HealthKit

  • 27.1 Apps using the HealthKit framework must comply with applicable law for each Territory in which the App is made available, as well as Sections 3.3.28 and 3.39 of the iOS Developer Program License Agreement
  • 27.2 Apps that write false or inaccurate data into HealthKit will be rejected
  • 27.3 Apps using the HealthKit framework that store users’ health information in iCloud will be rejected
  • 27.4 Apps may not use user data gathered from the HealthKit API for advertising or other use-based data mining purposes other than improving health, medical, and fitness management, or for the purpose of medical research
  • 27.5 Apps that share user data acquired via the HealthKit API with third parties without user consent will be rejected
  • 27.6 Apps using the HealthKit framework must indicate integration with the Health app in their marketing text and must clearly identify the HealthKit functionality in the app’s user interface
  • 27.7 Apps using the HealthKit framework must provide a privacy policy or they will be rejected
  • 27.8 Apps that provide diagnoses, treatment advice, or control hardware designed to diagnose or treat medical conditions that do not provide written regulatory approval upon request will be rejected

Section 28: TestFlight

  • 28.1 Apps may only use TestFlight to beta test apps intended for public distribution and must comply with the full App Review Guidelines
  • 28.2 Apps using TestFlight must be submitted for review whenever a build contains material changes to content or functionality
  • 28.3 Apps using TestFlight may not be distributed to testers in exchange for compensation of any kind

In addition, Apple has slightly modified its introduction to the App Store review guidelines to state that the App Store is off limits to apps that are “plain creepy”:

We have over a million Apps in the App Store. If your App doesn’t do something useful, unique or provide some form of lasting entertainment, or if your app is plain creepy, it may not be accepted.

Today’s update to the App Store review guidelines comes just a couple of days after Apple published a new webpage highlighting common reasons for app rejections and a week ahead of Apple’s special media event for the iOS 8-powered iPhone 6.